Posts Tagged ‘motivation’

Vacation Makeover: Teach yourself Project Management with these (mostly) free materials!

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Loads of links & plenty of great free resources to help you retool! Check out the full article here.

Edited: June 28th, 2016

Worth a Second Look: My 10 Favorite Articles & Videos from 2015

Check out these highlights from my 2015 publications!

Check out these highlights from my 2015 publications!

Edited: December 17th, 2015

40% OFF: My New Book “Worth Sharing” AND “The Project Management Minimalist”

Image: books on sale, special pricing

Special Pricing: Labor Day Weekend ONLY!!

This Labor Day weekend, to celebrate the introduction of my new book, Worth Sharing: Essays & Tools to Help Project Managers & Their Teams*, I’m reducing the price of the ebook versions of BOTH Worth Sharing…* AND my best selling The Project Management Minimalist.* But these special prices won’t last long, so take advantage of this deal while you can! The links are below:

amazon-logo-39-px-highKindle: Worth Sharing or The PM Minimalist: $9.99 -> $5.99

barnes-&-noble-logo-29-px-high  NOOK: Worth Sharing or The PM Minimalist: $9.99 -> $5.99

kobo-logo-40-px-high Kobo (epub) version: Worth Sharing only: $9.99 -> $5.99

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* Learn more about The Project Management Minimalist collection here... or check out an infographic of Worth Sharing: Essays & Tools… here.

Edited: September 4th, 2015

An Infographic: Worth Sharing… The Book

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Click here to learn how you can get your copy or read the entire 300-page book online for free!!

Edited: September 1st, 2015

My New Book: Read all 300 pages online, for FREE!

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Just published! My new book, Worth Sharing: Essays & Tools to Help Project Managers & Their Teams, is a 300 page eclectic compilation of practical PM tools, thought-provoking PM essays and suggestions for helping individual project managers and their teams stay sane while delivering good quality finished products. It consists of 54 Chapters and hundreds of live links to additional PM resources. Most of the chapters were originally published as blog posts through my websites and have never before been released in book form. (See http://worth-sharing.net for info on all my websites, blog posts, videos, etc.) A few chapters include some important, classic excerpts from my previous books.

The book is divided into six major Parts, including:

  • Part 1: The Meaning of Project Management (3 Chapters)
  • Part 2: PM Techniques (12 Chapters) 
  • Part 3: Working with Your Team & Maintaining Your Sanity (12 Chapters) 
  • Part 4: Peace of Mind (12 Chapters) 
  • Part 5: PM Leadership and Vision (7 Chapters)
  • Part 6: Of PM Skills and How They Are Acquired (8 Chapters)

You can read the entire book (all 300 pages!) online, for free. And it’s available in paperback & all ebook formats. Get details at my Worth Sharing website!

 

Edited: July 29th, 2015

Convergence: Everything Worth Sharing in One Place

Starting this month I will be publishing all my new blog posts, articles and other announcements at my WORTH SHARING website. I will continue to create articles and videos that are relevant to the topics you usually find here, including thoughts on Project Management (PM), managing teams, PM training and tools, and much more. To find these at the WORTH SHARING website, just click on the “PM Resources” tab (see diagram below).

Go to "PM Resources" tab, Mike Greer's WORTH SHARING website

Why the Convergence? 

The short answer is this:  To help you find all the stuff I believe to be “WORTH SHARING” in one location, no matter what the topic. (For a more detailed discussion, click here.)

Subscribe to the News Feed!

To make sure you never miss any of my new blog posts, articles, videos or announcements you can subscribe to my WORTH SHARING news feed via you favorite news reader or your Kindle.  Here’s how:

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Go to WORTH SHARING RSS Feed & Subscribe!

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Go to Amazon Kindle Subscribe Page for Mike Greer's WORTH SHARING website

Edited: June 18th, 2014

Reflections on Sochi, the “Second Screen” & Half-Baked Decisions

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A couple of weeks ago I tried to watch the Opening Ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Sochi. I say tried because I eventually became so frustrated by Matt Lauer’s and Meredith Vieira’s endless stream of intrusive babble that I switched the whole thing off. From what I saw, the ceremony had been painstakingly designed by its Olympic hosts to tell a story. The producers of the event had obviously worked hard to weave together a collection of objects, images, performers and music to create a spectacular narrative that highlighted Russia’s history.

Was it mere propaganda? Was it an idealized rewriting of history? Frankly, I can’t say because every time I started to become absorbed by the narrative and allow its images and music to carry me along with it, Lauer or Vieira would yank me out of the story line with their own narrative. And since theirs consisted mostly of arcane trivia, details of the mechanics of the production, or political editorializing, I found it impossible to sustain the sense of wonder that the grand production had been designed to stimulate. Unfortunately, turning off the sound to shut off their prattling also muted the beautiful music and sound effects. So I finally just gave up in disgust and switched the whole thing off.

A Colossal Waste!

As the room became silent, I found myself wondering about — and feeling sympathy for — the producers of the event. They clearly had undertaken months of preparation. They constructed a logical “through line” that told their story, then they rehearsed and coordinated hundreds of moving parts. In short, they had attempted to deliver a powerfully moving and cohesive viewer experience. Yet here sat these American TV talking heads intruding themselves at random throughout the event, dragging viewers on endless, mood-destroying side trips and distracting us from absorbing any coherent message or from being swept away in the spectacle. What a colossal waste!

Like Your Last Business Presentation?

The more I thought about it, however, the more I realized that this NBC-broadcast of the Sochi Olympic Opening Ceremony was an apt metaphor for many business meetings I’ve attended. The same elements are present:

  • Someone works hard to prepare a logical narrative, often supported with multi-media components.
  • This person rehearses, then delivers the presentation.
  • Members of the audience ostensibly attend to the presentation.
  • Members of the audience are ceaselessly, often pointlessly, interrupted by their own, personal talking heads in the form of the ever-present “second screen” of a smartphone or tablet.
  • These interrupted members of the audience, in turn, become someone else’s “second screen” interruptions as their fingers tap out terse little messages that intrude into another presenter’s carefully-crafted presentation.

The result of all this fracturing of a presenter’s logical, cohesive message is that attendees acquire an understanding of it that is incomplete or badly distorted.

Half-Baked Comprehension = Half-Baked Decisions!

Now here’s the big deal: What distinguishes these business presentations from the Olympics Opening Ceremony is that those attending are frequently called upon to take an action or make a decision at the conclusion. But if your recall of the presenter’s message is sketchy or skewed, your comprehension is… well… half-baked! And half-baked comprehension can only lead to half-baked decisions! 

So here’s your challenge: The next time you attend a meeting, try to fully “attend” to the presentation. Put yourself in the shoes of the presenter. Try to imagine the effort she expended to accumulate information, sift it down to its essences and build a presentation that would be engaging and informative. Then ask yourself if it makes good business sense to allow your own jabbering little device (your pocket-sized network talking head) to ceaselessly interrupt and water down your engagement.

(NOTE: For more on the phenomenon of scrambled consciousness & the illusion of competence held by “multi-taskers,” see Managing People with Self-Induced ADHD (er… Chronic Multitaskers)

Edited: February 27th, 2014

Step Away from the Computer & Get Out Your Post-It Notes!

[Update: This blog post has been included in the “PM Techniques” section of my book Worth Sharing: Essays & Tools to Help Project Managers & Their Teams.]

A while back I was teaching an introductory PM class for some high-achieving tech folks.  My overall goal was to begin to convert these perfectionists into project managers.  Mid-way through the first morning, I divided the class into several small groups of 4 or 5 people and assigned a series of planning exercises.  They had brought their own real world project ideas to class and the object of the game was to take a few of these from rough concept to full-blown, high-resolution project plans.  Each team had been given large Post-It notes, blank flip charts, and markers. There were also a couple of white boards available.

As the teams were working through the guided planning exercises, I could hear the familiar jumble of voices as ideas were bounced around, discussed, discarded, and revised.  One team, however, was strangely silent. Unlike the others who were up and moving about, they were seated around a table and looking at the back of one guy’s computer screen. I walked over to see what was going on. (more…)

Edited: April 25th, 2013

5 Actions That Will Help You Sell That Complicated Project

Let’s face it. You wouldn’t be a project manager if you fancied yourself a sales person. Indeed most project managers — particularly those who came up through the ranks of top project contributors and technical experts — hate all the “dog and pony show” stuff that’s involved in selling their projects.

But the truth is there is simply no one who is in a better position to draw clear connecting lines between your team’s amazing technical abilities and the value these bring to your organization through your project. What’s more, as your project unfolds, you are going to need the enthusiastic support of senior management to help you get the money, people, facilities, equipment, and engaged participation of SMEs that will bring success. So it’s up to you and the specific actions you take to build the sale and generate that much-needed senior management enthusiasm.

So where do you begin? Here are 5 actions that can help you sell your project to senior management:

(more…)

Edited: January 29th, 2013

June/July Issue of PM Minimalist Update Is Now Available

I just emailed my latest PM Minimalist Update to subscribers.  It’s loaded with articles, links, and more. Check it out here:

Highlights from this issue include:

(more…)

Edited: July 31st, 2012